Sample Courses

Click the course titles to download an editable syllabus for each course. Feel free to use or adapt these course materials as needed. If you teach one of these courses or adapt any of the assignments described here, I would love to hear your feedback!


Technical Writing

In this course, you will develop a familiarity with writing and analyzing technical documents for a variety of contexts. You will learn to identify the contexts of specific professional and technical genres of writing so that you will be able to apply those skills to new genres in the future. This technique will allow you to adapt your writing to the audience and purpose at hand in any given technical writing situation.Furthermore, you will be asked to work independently, in pairs, and in small groups to complete the various tasks and assignments designed to help you develop this set of transferable skills.

This course is designed to help you meet the objectives set forth by the Professional Writing program. In this course, students will:

  • Design, write, and edit documents for a variety of professional contexts
  • Use research and critical-thinking skills to appropriately complete tasks in professional communication
  • Develop an understanding of both common and developing professional and technical writing genres
  • Utilize interpersonal communication and managerial skill sets to complete team-based activities
  • Practice working with common software tools for professional writers (word processors, desktop publishing, video editing, web design, etc.) to produce high-quality print and electronic documents.

My ultimate goals for this course are for you to develop improved communication and analytical skills, enabling you to become better prepared professional communicators.


Expository Writing: Literacy for Life

In this course, you will be exposed to basic information and practice that will allow you to transition into the realms of academic and “real-world” writing while also informing you about writing as a field. In this course, you will heavily focus on identifying the context of specific genres of writing so that you will be able to apply those skills to new genres in the future, allowing you to adapt your writing to the audience and purpose at hand in any given writing situation. To accomplish this, you will construct clear thesis statements and use your individual writing processes to systematically plan each assignment to address the specific context. To support your assertions, you will collect and analyze both primary and secondary data and read and analyze different types of texts, including print, visual, and digital.

The ultimate goals for this course are for you to develop improved communication and analytical skills and to become more informed members of the academic community.


Venomous Vendettas:
An Exploration of Acts of Vengeance and Rivalry
from Bassanio to The Black Keys

This course provides students the opportunity to trace a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. The English department has specific objectives for this course, and I have condensed those into the following goals for our course.
You will:

  • be exposed to the variety of texts that are available to you as a reader
  • show critical analysis through your thinking, reading, and writing
  • discuss how the structural and technical elements of a text contribute to how it is received or interpreted
  • identify ways in which texts are “in conversation” with previous and contemporary texts
  • be thoughtful about the ways cultures influence texts and texts influence cultures
  • embrace your own critical approach and value your interpretations as well as those of others

In this course specifically, we will consider how both fictional and historical feuds have been presented and responded to throughout history while also investigating how seeking revenge affects not only the avenger and the transgressor but also the community. Hopefully, this will lead to a better understanding of how the acts of the few can affect the many as well as a better understanding of the societal expectations of the past and how they affect present society.


(Note: These descriptions are written as they would be presented to students.)